Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4th 1776 announced to the World that the Thirteen Colonies were no longer a part of the British Empire.

Asked in African-American History, Declaration of Independence

Why are whites better than blacks?

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Whites are definetly better than blacks. We ARE not all the same people one is better than the other.
Asked in History of the United States, Declaration of Independence

How are the Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen similar?

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The Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen are similar in that they both show that the people want freedom from the current form of government, that the common people are not happy with their lot, and that they want a new leader.
Asked in Declaration of Independence, History of France

How was the French Declaration of Rights of Man and the Citizen similar to the American Declaration of Independence?

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The Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, was modeled in part on the American Declaration of Independence. All men, the French declaration announced, were "born and remain free and equal in rights."
Asked in Founding Fathers, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

Who was the main author of the Declaration of Independence?

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Although Thomas Jefferson is often credited as the sole writer of the document, the Declaration (1776) was a collaborative effort. Jefferson was the one responsible for writing both the first and final draft. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. The US Constitution had a much wider authorship, with various sections provided by many of the Founding Fathers. The various suggestions and clauses were merged into a first draft by a "Committee of Detail" consisting of: John Rutledge (SC) Edmund Randolph (VA) Nathaniel Gorham (MA) Oliver Ellsworth (CT) James Wilson (PA)
Asked in US Constitution, Declaration of Independence

How did the states get their shape?

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The history of the forming of the borders of the united states are incredibly complicated, and it would be hard to write the all out here without plagurism. For a comprehensive list of all the border changes, with maps and dates, see the link in the related links section, below.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Declaration of Independence

Who was the main writer of the Declaration of Independence?

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Thomas Jefferson is often credited as the sole writer of the document, but the Declaration (1776) was a collaborative effort. Jefferson was the one responsible for writing both the first and final draft. However, he was actually part of a committee appointed by the Second Continental Congress to write it. The other four members were Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston and Roger Sherman, all of whom provided recommendations on the language of the document. Thomas Jefferson was the main writer of the Declaration of Independence. The Draft of which was heavily edited by the Continental Congress can be seen in: Adrienne Koch and William Peden eds., The Life and Selected Writings of Thomas Jefferson (New York: Random House, 1944). Thomas Jefferson
Asked in Computer Terminology, Declaration of Independence

What is Evidence of bias for the Declaration of Independence?

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One obvious form of bias is that although it admitted that "all people are endowed with certain Rights by their Creator, among them Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness", slaves were still widely used and treated inhumanely until almost 200 years after the Declaration was written. This went the same with women, although they were treated unfairly to a lesser degree compared to slaves.
Asked in History of the United States, Fourth of July, Declaration of Independence

When did America become independent?

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July 4 1776 is what many people think, but we actually officially became independent on July 8 1776. Many people thought that the 8th should be independence day, as I do. I would add that the Continental Congress declared independence from Great Britain in 1776. The American Colonies were a huge source of revenue to Britain, and they weren't about to let an asset like that slip through their grasp. So, the Colonies would have to fight for their independence against one of the strongest armies in the world (no easy task, mind you). It wasn't until September 3rd, 1783 when the Treaty of Paris was signed by Britain and the United States that independence was acknolwledged. So, maybe we ought to write Congress and petition for September 3rd to be acknowledged as our true Independence Day? Just a thought. I don't think it'd happen anyhow as we already have the 4th of July set aside and it would confuse many folks.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence

What were Thomas Jefferson's views on slavery?

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Jefferson's views on slavery were contradictory: On one hand, Jefferson was morally opposed to slavery. He felt it was evil and wrong. His original draft of the Declaration of Independence condemned it in no uncertain terms. As Governor of Virginia, he proposed legislation to abolish it. On the other hand, despite his moral opposition though, he owned a significant number of slaves and even fathered children with one of his slaves, Sally Hemmings.
Asked in Founding Fathers, History of the United States, Declaration of Independence

Who signed the Declaration of Independence?

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The 56 signatories of the Declaration of Independence were: Connecticut (4): Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott Delaware (3): Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean Georgia (3): Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton Maryland (4): Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton Massachusetts (5): John Hancock, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry New Hampshire (3): Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton New Jersey (5): Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark New York (4): William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris North Carolina (3): William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn Pennsylvania (9): Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross Rhode Island (2): Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery South Carolina (4): Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward Jr., Thomas Lynch Jr., Arthur Middleton Virginia (7): George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton Delaware • George Read • Caesar Rodney • Thomas McKean Pennsylvania • George Clymer • Benjamin Franklin • Robert Morris • John Morton • Benjamin Rush • George Ross • James Smith • James Wilson • George Taylor Massachusetts • John Adams • Samuel Adams • John Hancock • Robert Treat Paine • Elbridge Gerry New Hampshire • Josiah Bartlett • William Whipple • Matthew Thornton Rhode Island • Stephen Hopkins • William Ellery New York • Lewis Morris • Philip Livingston • Francis Lewis • William Floyd Georgia • Button Gwinnett • Lyman Hall • George Walton Virginia • Richard Henry Lee • Francis Lightfoot Lee • Carter Braxton • Benjamin Harrison • Thomas Jefferson • George Wythe • Thomas Nelson, Jr. North Carolina • William Hooper • John Penn • Joseph Hewes South Carolina • Edward Rutledge • Arthur Middleton • Thomas Lynch, Jr. • Thomas Heyward, Jr. New Jersey • Abraham Clark • John Hart • Francis Hopkinson • Richard Stockton • John Witherspoon Connecticut • Samuel Huntington • Roger Sherman • William Williams • Oliver Wolcott Maryland • Charles Carroll • Samuel Chase • Thomas Stone • William Paca Samuel adams
Asked in History of the United States, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

What were the goals of the first and second continental congress?

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the first one declared loyalty to the king and boycotted British goods and also called for each state to start armies also they said that the intolerable acts were not right the second wrote the declaration of independence and started coming up with a form of government. VERSACE VERSACE
Asked in Founding Fathers, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

What happened to the signers of the Declaration of Independence?

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The 56 men who signed the Declaration were not token patriots when they pledged their lives and honor to the cause of freedom. The average age was 44 and the youngest was 26. Ben Franklin was the oldest at 70. Most had money, none were hungry, and none were out of work. They actually laid their lives and fortunes on the line for freedom. Of the 56 men 5 were arrested by the British as traitors, 12 had their homes looted and burned, 2 lost sons in the war, 17 lost their fortunes, 9 fought in the war and died. Three of the signers lived to be over 90, 10 lived past 80, and 11 past 70. They came from all walks of life; 24 were lawyers, 14 farmers, 4 doctors, 9 merchants, and one minister. Three were born in Ireland, two in England and Scotland, one in Wales. During the war they were offered immunity to come back to the British cause. None did. One signer, George Wythe, was poisoned by his grand nephew at the age of 80. Samuel Chase became part of the Supreme Court and Caesar Rodney died of cancer. Button Gwenette became governor of GA and was killed in a duel at the age of 42. Oliver Woolcott became governor of Connecticut. Thomas Lynch, Jr. disappeared 3 years later with his wife on a voyage to the West Indies. Charles Carroll lived to 90 and died in 1832. He helped lay the cornerstone of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad.
Asked in Monarchy, Declaration of Independence

What was the purpose of sending the Declaration to King George III?

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To declare that the colonies had officially become independent from King George's rule.
Asked in Religion & Spirituality, Founding Fathers, Declaration of Independence

What did religion mean to our founding forefathers?

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The first fact that must be established is that when we speak of founders we speak of the individuals who fought the British and wrote the United States Constitution. We are not speaking of the pilgrims who sailed to the New World for their own religious freedom and who did not allow any religious freedom to people not of their own persuasion. Most pilgrims apart from the Puritans in Colonial Massachusetts came to the New World for economic opportunities. Further, the Puritan form of strict, orthodox religious governance had fizzled out by 1776. Notably, the Puritans would not have accepted people from the many Christian denominations that later peopled the colonies. It was their way or the highway. The founders were Christian and religious for the most part. However, not all shared the same personal beliefs and not all shared the same level of religiosity. Those who were Deists did not believe in the hands-on God who rules for the modern Christians today. Jefferson was a skeptic but he strongly supported religious liberty. President Adams declared in a 1797 treaty, “The Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.†Christianity was specifically not mentioned in the Constitution or Bill or Rights and America was not founded as a theocracy. The Founders of the American republic were influenced by a variety of sources that included Christian ideas and secular ideas that sprung from the Enlightenment, the intellectual movement of the late 17th and 18th centuries that emphasized reason and individualism rather than tradition. It is important to note that the great intellectuals of the Enlightenment were extremely skeptical of Christianity. The founders were influenced by English legal and political traditions, political disasters experienced in Europe under governments heavily influenced by the Pope, state interests, self interests, and class issues. We must be aware they used the language of the times in their writings, which was rife with religious expression and educated people were generally the products of religious educators. If the Founders were confronted by the language of today they would not likely understand it.
Asked in American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

When was the US Declaration of Independence signed?

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Although it was announced on July 4, 1776, the Declaration was first signed on August 2, 1776, with the last signature being added in late November. There is no single, perfect date for the adoption of the Declaration. The completed Declaration was accepted on July 2 and some delegates believed that would become an important day in history. On July 4, 1776, a scheduled meeting to discuss the Declaration was cut short and delegates agreed to the wording in principle before adjourning (some say the adjournment was due to nasty horseflies invading the hall). On July 8, it was published as a broadside (at first with only John Hancock's signature). By August, it was published again with most of the signatures. There is no one official version of the Declaration of Independence. Three slightly different versions were approved. The famous painting of the delegates all standing or seated in Independence Hall, waiting to sign the document, is pure fiction. There was never a time when all the signers were together in one place at one time. August 2, 1776
Asked in Founding Fathers, George Washington, Declaration of Independence

Why didn't George Washington sign the Declaration of Independence?

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Prior to its work on the Declaration of Independence, the Second Continental Congress included Washington as a congressman from Virginia. But he resigned his position as a delegate when Congress formed the Continental Army and appointed him commanding general on June 14, 1775. So he was unavailable to participate, or to sign the Declaration.
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Why did Galileo sign a declaration?

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No. He was an Italian and not alive in 1776. The document was written by Jefferson with the help,of Adams and Franklin. It listed the wrongs of the king towards to colonies.
Asked in Thomas Jefferson, Declaration of Independence, Cherokee Indians

What was Thomas Jeffersons's cognitive dissonance?

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I'm not going to say that this was his only one, but Jefferson had trouble recognizing the inherent freedom of those who were not Caucasian balanced with their human political rights & freedoms. I guess the same could be said with his views on national and state governments; he saw it as easier to effect change and protect rights in a local setting but at the same time recognized that a 'majority rule' doctrine was destroying human rights without some form of federal oversight to bring all states inline.
Asked in Founding Fathers, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence

Would the American Revolution have failed if the emancipation of slaves was included in the Declaration of Independence?

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Yes; most definitely. The northern and southern colonies would have been divided and, thus, there would have been no American Revolution to begin with. The South would have most likely remained loyal to Britain and the North could not fight on their own. MoreIt's not possible to say whether the Revolution would have succeeded or failed if the Declaration of Independence had included a clause that emancipated slaves. Though slavery was present in all the colonies, it was most prevalent in the southern colonies, those most dependent on inexpensive labor in a farm-based economy. By the time of the Revolution, many in the northern colonies had already divested themselves of slaves, though less out of a sense of moral duty than out of a need for simple thrift. Slaves, while providing "free" labor, did tend to eat every day, and had to be clothed and housed, however poorly. In the north, a trend away from agriculture was beginning to obviate the need for the cheap labor of slaves. In the event, the Revolution was fought primarily by northerners, on northern territory, and had little impact on the southern colonies. It is easy to speculate that the outcome of the war itself would have been the same. However, the ratification of the Constitution would have been a much tougher go if it had banned slavery. Slavery was a minute issue in 1776. It could have been handled properly in the nation under the Articles of Confederation, or in the US Constitution. Slave states then were a handful. If they refused to join the US, the US would have prospered without slavery. It's too bad the Framers failed to see this.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Declaration of Independence, Liberia

Who were the men that signed the Declaration of Independence of Liberia?

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what are the names of those men that signed the declaration of liberia indepedence
Asked in History of England, Founding Fathers, Declaration of Independence

Who was Phillip Livingston?

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Answer He was a New York delegate who signed the Declaration of Independence. SHe was in strong favor of the Declaration of Independence.

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